Toronto holds Caribbean carnival

CNC report from Toronto
Added On August 6, 2013

Revellers from around the world gathered in Toronto over the weekend for one of the biggest parades on the North American continent -- the 46th annual Toronto Caribbean Carnival.

During three weeks of partying, the carnival celebrates the culture of Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica and all the neighbouring islands.

STANDUP: PHOEBE HO, CNC correspondent
"It's an explosion of colors here in the city of Toronto. Now the carnival in Trinidad might be the mecca of all carnivals, but this one here is definitely not lacking in any way. It's got the dancing, the music and over a million excited revellers and spectators who are all ready to party all through the day."

The event was a one-off gift from the Caribbean community to celebrate Canada's centennial back in 1967. But because of its popularity, it's been brought back year after year and has since grown in both size and scale.

The event brings in countless people of all ages to celebrate together. Sixty-year-old Juliana Osborne says she comes to Toronto especially for the carnival every year.

SOUNDBITE: JULIANA OSBORNE, Reveller
"I'm from Boston, first time was seven years ago, and I said ,'oh no, I have to play.' So I've been playing six years with the same band Saldina.  So it's a yearly pilgrimage from Boston. We drive over 10 hours, we go to parties, this is the big one and it's my day to enjoy.”

Osborne says she travels to numerous Caribbean carnivals throughout the year.

SOUNDBITE: JULIANA OSBORNE, Reveller
"I'm from Trinidad, and you play Mas, you play Mas, you live it, it's in your blood, so I do it."

It's a big day for the Caribbean community, and pretty much anyone who appreciates a good party. 

SOUNDBITE: SHEENA KEARNEY, Reveller
"I'd have to say the music, just to shake your 'thang thang'."

Taking place in one of the most diverse cities in the world, the carnival has become a place where people of all backgrounds get together to share and learn all about the Caribbean culture.
 
SOUNDBITE: SHEENA KEARNEY, Reveller
"It means equality, everybody's the same. Just have a good time, do your thing you know."