STORY HIGHLIGHTS


US National Museum of Animals & Society

CNC
Added On October 12, 2014

Being listed as one of the Best Small and Sometimes Strange Museums in Los Angeles, the US National Museum of Animals and Society is getting more attention. 
 
Let's have a look.
 
Opened in 2010, the National Museum of Animals and Society is the first institution of its kind, dedicated to enriching the lives of animals and people by exploring our shared experience. 
 
Founded by animal activist Carolyn Mullin, this museum has been featuring an active roster of exhibits and events focused on representing the animal protection movement.
 
SOUNDBITE: CAROLYN MULLIN, Founder 
"I know it is a funky little name: Animals and Society, but it means so much. Because humans have society, but animals have their own societies too, which I think is really interesting. For example, there are some researcher think chimpanzees actually have spirituality, they watch the sunrise and the sunset, and that is something normally people will tribute just to humans, but as researching and science showing animals have their own cultures and it is very interesting. We do look into people and animals, and the relations we have with each other." 
 
Started on August 9th, a new exhibition "Dog Cat Mouse" is now ongoing. 
 
"Dog, Cat, Mouse" features the work of Erika Carter, Heather Mattoon, and Virginia McCracken, three artists who center their creativity around canines, felines or the more diminutive, but no less important rodent. 
 
It puts Dog Cat Mouse arts in the same room and presents a lovely, interesting and peaceful relation among those three animals. 
 
SOUNDBITE: CAROLYN MULLIN, Founder 
"Our exhibitions are all over the board, and every time you come in you will see something new, something different and something unexpected. So today we on exhibit "Dog Cat Mouse," which is an art exhibition about doggy, kitten and mice. We had an exhibition on chickens which is really neat, there are definitely doggy and kitty people, but there are people who really love chickens, so it was great popular exhibit." 
 
In May 2014, the National Museum of Animals and Society featured a historical exhibition called "Light in Dark Places," 
 
It looks at the visionary individuals and organizations that brought and continue to bring the plight of animals in labs to the surface. 
 
This retrospective on the history of fighting animal testing is the first on its kind to chronicle such a history.
 
SOUNDBITE: CAROLYN MULLIN, Founder 
"There was not a museum about the animal protection movements, people love animals, we are just a whole world, we are global citizens that love animals, whether it is dogs or cat or birds or mice or rats, we just did a rats adoption event, people love all sorts of animals, but there was not a museum that really focusing on these relationships, so we started because we wanted to start documenting that movement, who started the first animal shuttle, who implementing the laws of protecting animals, none of that were in the museum world." 
 
Beyond animal protection, which actually dates back centuries, the museum also focuses on events where animals and society intersect through the arts, humanities, science, and humane education. 
 
For example, the museum feathered an exhibition called 'My Dog is My Home' in 2013, which explores the story of homeless and their pets. 
 
This exhibit seeks to acknowledge how deep and strong the human-animal bond is especially for people who have little else in their lives and find their home in the heart of an animal. 
 
"My Dog is My Home" carries out the museum' s mission of exploring "our shared experience" through the lens of the redemptive bond between humans and animals who live together on the streets.
 
SOUNDBITE: CAROLYN MULLIN, Founder
"We opened this facility with the exhibition called 'My Dog is My Home,' which looked at the homeless have animal companies, that was a great exhibit, something really close to home for people here in Los Angeles, if you drive around at any street, you are going to find a homeless person and usually they have an animal with them, so we looked at that bond, it is a really important bond for the homeless." 
 
Being listed as one of the Best Small and Sometimes Strange Museums In Los Angeles, the National Museum of Animals and Society is getting more attention and getting bigger. 
 
For everyone who has pets, for everyone who loves animals, for everyone who cares about our friends on this planet, the National Museum of Animals and Society is the place to go and a museum worth supporting.