Mexico earthquake aftermath

CNC
Added On September 23, 2017

Officials say 293 people have been confirmed killed in the 7.1-magnitude earthquake that hit central Mexico on Tuesday.  
 
Officials on Friday said rescue efforts continue to search for survivors trapped in collapsed buildings.  
 
More than half of the victims died in the capital Mexico City. 
 
In the past 24 hours, officials have insisted that rescue workers, including army and navy personnel, continue to sift through the rubble where there are still signs of survivors.
   
Specialized rescue teams from Japan, Israel, El Salvador, Ecuador and the United States have joined the rescue efforts. 
 
As the city is still reeling from the shock of being hit by the earthquake,heartwarming stories of volunteers pulling survivors from rubble are around.  
 
solidarity and anguish  
 
Tragedy and solidarity are the two key words on national and local newspapers. 
 
As part of emergency measures, all public transport in the city has been made free of charge while Uber has also waivered fees for passengers for two days.  
 
The earthquake hit on the 32nd anniversary of the 1985 earthquake which killed thousands. 
 
Lessons of the past were quickly visible as citizens organized and set up collection centers, houses were turned into shelters, and parking lots were used as bases to organize supplies. 
 
Long queues of cars stopped by collection centers as volunteers opened trunks and human chains gathered food, medicine, tools, baby care products and pet food.  
 
SOUNDBITE 1 (Spanish): KEN MERINO, Collection center manager 
"I think Mexico is well prepared compared to the earthquake of 1985. It seems that there is no organization but people are very supportive. I did not expect to find so much humanity, we have become more sensitive."
 
Moving scenes of rescuers still trying to find survivors went viral on social media, with numerous tweets of support as people tried to find the best way to help.  
 
Although the death toll is expected to rise further, the people of Mexico are showing that in their darkest hour, they can count on each other.