Science on wheels benefits Nigerian student

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Added On November 13, 2017

Science is one of the most fun subjects in school.
 
An innovative way of bringing science education to schools in Nigeria's rural north could offer a way unlock  future tech prosperity.
 
A truck equipped with laboratory equipment tours the northwestern Katsina state in Nigeria.
 
As the hometown of President Muhammadu Buhari, Katsina is one of the poorest states and the quality of education is incredibly low in the country.
 
To bridge the gap, the state government and the charity organization Volunteer Service Overseas have come up with a programme named "Mobile Science Lab". 
 
The mobile van with a set of lab resouces and a qualified teacher trainer  rotates between 15 schools reaching around 7,500 pupils.
 
And over 400 schools are to be covered by this pilot project.
 
SOUNDBITE (ENG) AMINU BELLO MASARI, Katsina State Governor
"We believe that we are far lagging behind. For us to be able to compete within the country and globally, we have to put education as our first priority."
 
The "Mobile Science Lab" offers an interactive, get-your-hands-on-it learning experience.
 
It introduces a better understanding of science, maths and technology, and inspires more young people to explore science through practice.
 
SOUNDBITE (ENG)LUCIA BALONWU, Volunteer Service Overseas Director
"That we have a van that has equipment for science subjects in a context where there are schools who take science subjects but do not have laboratories."
 
SOUNDBITE (ENG) UMAR HARUNA, Student
"Before the program came to my school, my interest was in being an engineer but due to the help of this mobile science lab, it has changed my interest from being an engineer to being a medical doctor because, with the aid of the apparatus in the van, our biology teacher can now practicalize everything for us." 
 
The most populated country in Africa has a low performance in science and mathematics education.
 
Lack of funding for infrastructure and laboratory supplies, science subjects in most of Nigeria's rural schools were taught using theory only.