Bike-Share to launch in Africa

CNC
Added On December 7, 2017

China-made environmentally-friendly bicycles are about to hit the streets of Africa.
 
The bicycles are convenient for short urban trips while reducing congestion and air pollution.
 
Lifestyle has more.
 
After launching in places from Milan to Malaysia, the Chinese firm Mobike is bringing its bicycle-sharing system to Nairobi, Kenya. 
 
If successful, Mobike says the scheme could be rolling out to other African cities in the near future.
 
SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH)STEVE MILTON, Mobike Official
"We brought 100 bikes here at the assembly in Nairobi, this are the first Mobikes in Africa and we going to evaluate and see how it goes here at the UN team and maybe in the future, I can't say when we would see Mobikes in the rest of Africa."
 
The firm says it hopes to reduce the Kenyan capital's traffic congestion, and give locals a cleaner, cheaper way to take short trips. 
 
SOUNDBITE(ENGLISH):STEVE MILTON, Mobike Official
"So in Africa we have issues that we have in other markets which is congestion and pollution and those are the things mo bike tackles, so I think the need for mobiles is certainly here we just have to work how we do when we do it."
 
Mobike is currently China's leading bicycle-sharer. 
 
The bikes use simcards and Global Positioning System tracking system, so that each can be easily found and unlocked by users using the mobike app.
 
At the end of their ride, users simply return the bikes to a designated Mobike location, or any regular bike parking area, and the trip is discounted from their balance.
 
SOUNDBITE(ENGLISH):STEVE MILTON, Mobike Official
"So the bike is a shared bike it means you don’t need to own your own bike you can use one at any time. Its convenient for what we call "last mile" transportation, so moving from you office to train station or other location. So its super convenient and its shared economy."
 
The bicycles are already being used across countries including China, the United States, Germany, Italy, and Singapore. 
 
The tech is also currently being exhibited at the nearby ongoing United Nations Environmental Assembly, with a number of bikes free for attendees to use.
 
So the delegates aren't just discussing sustainability - they are also riding their way to a greener future.