STORY HIGHLIGHTS


Company news

CNC
Added On January 11, 2018

Let's take a look at some company news now.
 
And first, top U.S. aircraft manufacturer Boeing says that it delivered a record number of commercial airplanes last year.
 
With 763 deliveries, the firm managed to sell around 135 billion U.S. dollars worth of aircraft worldwide.
 
STORY: BOEING REPORTS RECORD JET DELIVERIES IN 2017
 
In a statement, Boeing said that it "delivered more commercial airplanes than any manufacturer for the sixth consecutive year and set an industry record with 763 deliveries in 2017."
 
According to the aerospace giant, its larger order book was driven by a high output of the market-leading model 737 and 787 jets.
 
By the end of last year, Boeing says it struck deals with 71 customers worldwide for a total of 912 new orders. 
 
The firm now has a backlog of a record of nearly 6,000 commercial airplanes, equal to about seven years of production.
 
European rival Airbus is slated to report its 2017 orders and deliveries next week.
 
STORY: TOYOTA RECALLS 600,000 MORE VEHICLES IN US
 
Toyota Motor North America announced Tuesday it was expanding its safety recall involving Takata front passenger airbag inflators as required by the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).
 
Toyota said the expansion involves approximately 600,000 additional vehicles in the United States. 
 
According to NHTSA, by the end of November 2017, 19 automakers had recalled 46 million Takata inflators, in 34 million U.S. vehicles.
 
STORY: INTEL TO MAKE FLAWED CHIPS SAFE IN A WEEK 
 
Intel's chief executive says that software fixes to address the recently discovered Meltdown and Spectre bugs in microchips will be released in the next few days.
 
Intel CEO Brian Krzanich said 90 percent of processors and products from the past five years would be patched "within a week". 
 
Meanwhile, the firm is coming under fire for a 25 million dollar profit made by Krzanich in stock sales, several weeks before the company disclosed the flaw. 
 
On Tuesday, two U.S. lawmakers sent a letter, asking federal regulators to open an investigation into the incident.
 
They told the agencies that they were troubled by a series of stock sales that Intel CEO Brian Krzanich completed Nov. 29. 
 
The trades were made at time that Intel knew about security bugs that weren't disclosed until last week.
 
Krzanich sold his stock at over 44 dollars a share. 
 
Yesterday, The company's shares closed at 43 dollars 62 cents.
 
Intel said it will cooperate with any investigation.