American farmers struggled against Trump's tarrifs

CNC
Added On September 10, 2018

 In the U.S.,American farmers are gearing up for their busiest season of the year, the harvest.

However, many farmers are struggling against the on-going US tariffs.
 
Let's take a look.
 
SOUNDBITE(ENGLISH): FRED YODER, Farmer in Ohio
"My name is Fred Yoder, I'm a farmer here in plain city, Ohio. I raise corn, soybeans and wheat most the time. I farm with my family and I'm the fourth-generation farmer. "
 
Yoder and his family farm around 1500 acres of corn and soybeans, and China is his major market.
 
Since the trade friction between the United States and China started roughly two months ago, his phone has been “ringing off the hook” as local farmers all calling him for help.
 
Meanwhile, soybean farmers have been expanding their crops to meet the growing demand of the Chinese market. But now they face losing this important market.
 
SOUNDBITE(ENGLISH): FRED YODER, Farmer in Ohio
"You know, China was buying so much plant protein such as, as, as, uh, soybeans that, uh, we were, we were counting on a rapid expansion of that. I think we're going to see rapid expansion of the soybean acres, but it's probably going to be in South America instead of up here now because the Brazil is taken advantage of the new markets because of the tariffs of the United States."
 
Yoder said win-win in trade should be the way to go for the United States and trade with China has made both peoples' lives better.
 
SOUNDBITE(ENGLISH): FRED YODER, Farmer in Ohio
"I'm hoping that cool heads prevail. And a common sense that, that these tariffs are not going to do anybody any good, that the consumers in both China and United States will be paying more. That doesn't make sense to me, you know, one of the things that we've enjoyed for many years now is being able to buy goods and services from the Chinese companies that we could never have afforded before."
 
Yoder also stressed U.S. agriculture cannot survive without international trade, and the Chinese market is irreplaceable for U.S. farmers.
 
SOUNDBITE(ENGLISH): FRED YODER, Farmer in Ohio
"If you're going to produce more, you have to have markets. There's no way we're going to ever survive without trade. US agriculture can not survive without international trade, and China was our biggest trade partner and it's going to be very difficult."
 
Moreover, an Ohio State Senator stated that the 12-billion-dollar aid for farmers actually stifles growth and farmers' competitiveness.
 
SOUNDBITE(ENGLISH): MATT DOLAN, Ohio State Senator
"Our government has made a decision which I do not agree with and that is we're going to, in order to make up for the loss revenues of shipping our product, we're now going to subsidize here, which stifles growth, which stifles the ability for farmers to be competitive amongst each other. And they don't now have, they don't really have to compete and make the product better."
 
Ohio was the 7th largest soybean producing state in 2017 and China bought nearly 700 million dollars' worth of soybeans from the state. 
 
The executive director of Ohio Soybean Association noted the significance of China’s market.
 
SOUNDBITE(ENGLISH): KIRK MERRITT, Executive Director, Ohio Soybean Association
"China was, in the most recent year, a 14 billion US dollars market for US soybeans, part of which obviously come from Ohio. No single market will replace that. So our goal would be to maintain China and then increase China and other markets as our production increases in the future."