US-China Policy Hackathon

CNC
Added On October 7, 2018

The first U.S.-China Policy Hackathon has kicked off in Austin, the capital city of U.S. state of Texas.
 
It gathers U.S. and Chinese entrepreneurs and officials to discuss how to make use of subnational collaboration to bring more mutual benefits.
 
 
The U.S.-China Policy Hackathon was held in Austin on Wednesday, and more than 20 American and Chinese entrepreneurs, business leaders and policy makers attended the event.
 
The event was co-hosted by the China Public Policy Center (CPPC) at the University of Texas at Austin, U.S.-China Innovation Alliance (UCIA) and the Capital Factory, a center of gravity for entrepreneurs in Texas.
 
Collaboration and exchanges were the priorities of the discussion.
 
Participants shared the view that in the current context of U.S.-China relations, subnational collaboration and people-to-people exchanges between the two countries are the viable and sustainable path toward positive results.
 
SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH): DAVID FIRESTEIN, Founding Executive Director at CPPC
"By bringing those particular perspectives together, a Chinese entrepreneur, an American entrepreneur and a policy expert, we think that we do a better job of covering the bases in terms of the different perspectives and getting the kind of input that we need to advance ideas that are going to work better in the real world."
 
This idea was echoed by Timothy Stratford, the managing partner of Beijing office at Covington & Burling LLP and former assistant U.S. trade representative for U.S.-China trade relations.
 
SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH): TIMOTHY STRATFORD, Former Assistant US Trade Representative
"When you can interact on a person-to-person basis, then people can understand and work out complicated problems much better."
 
Firestein also believed local-level activities could push forward the mutually beneficial and politically sustainable relationship.
 
SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH): DAVID FIRESTEIN, Founding Executive Director at CPPC
"State-to-state, state-to-province, or community-to-community engagement are the kind of things that we think we can do more and should do more to generate a ballast in the U.S.-China economic trade, investment and business engagement relationship."