Brexit cold negatively impacts British lorry drivers

CNC
Added On October 15, 2019

 British plans to leave the EU could have a huge impact on the Port of Dover, one of Europe's busiest ferry ports.

 
Economy Report has the story.
 
Miroslav Matasic, a Serbian lorry driver, was being held at East Kent customs in Dover, one of Europe's busiest ferry ports and Britain's sea connection to the European Union (EU), for a longer period than usual due to some issues with documentation.
 
He worries that with Britain due to leave the EU on Oct. 31, he will have to spend even more time away from home.
 
SOUNDBITE 4 (ENGLISH): MIROSLAV MATASIC, Serbian Lorry Driver
 
"I worry about the time that I will spend in customs with documents, I think I will lose a lot more time when Brexit wins."
 
After Brexit, be it deal or no-deal, it will be a completely different scenario: Lorries that come from the EU will have to pass through customs for checks and any minor delays are projected to cause queues for those arriving.
 
Many lorry drivers are concerned that increased border controls and mandatory customs checks will affect the time they spend in transit.
 
SOUNDBITE 3 (ENGLISH): CRAIG PHILLIPS, Lorry Driver
 
"My journey currently takes two weeks across Europe, after Brexit it will probably be different because you'll have to stop at every border, hand paperwork over, check the truck, watching the truck etc… I don't know if because of Brexit that will be extended by a month - maybe two months, I don't know. Who knows?"
 
The Freight Transport Association (FTA), is a UK logistics specialist company, who have been working closely with the government to minimize the effect that these queues could have on those in the freight industry, especially lorry drivers.
 
Heidi Skinner, policy and public affairs manager for the FTA, said the delays could disrupt British supply chains.
 
SOUNDBITE 1 (ENGLISH): HEIDI SKINNER, Policy and Public Affairs Manager, FTA
 
"Obviously we're looking at the government's concerns on up to 1 and a half to two days delays and that is based around that 'border readiness'. Every company is very different, it depends upon the products that they are carrying across; whether that's fresh goods, animals, medicines - all the stamps and checks that need to be done on that, every product is very different and particularly, if a truck is carrying groupage: which is a number of different parcels from a number of different owners, there's an exceptional amount of paperwork and clearances that are required."