Harvard professor forsees further China-US 'co-opetition'

CNC
Added On November 3, 2019

A Harvard professor says the United States should learn to come to terms with the nature of today's China-U.S. relations, featuring both competition and cooperation. Professor Michael Szonyi said that China and the U.S. have to coexist and their long-term relationship will involve more competition and cooperation. Like many China experts in the United States, he says the so-called "China-U.S. decoupling" is neither rational nor possible. SOUNDBITE(English): MICHAEL SZONYI, Director of Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University "It was also true that the rise of China generally was benefited the United States. It benefited us economically. You look at the any American home and you see that it may not be reflected in the numbers, but the accessibility of cheaper electronics from China. It made life better for Americans." Szonyi said it's important to understand China in a global context. SOUNDBITE(English): MICHAEL SZONYI, Director of Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University You need to understand China in relation to the rest of the world. You need to understand for example, Belt and Road. It's very important that the American public that American policymakers have good information about China.” He said he remains optimistic about bilateral relations, due to the economic upside of engaging with China, the need for the United States to assume its global responsibilities, such as dealing with climate change, and the large number of young Chinese students in the U.S. There are currently over 360,000 students from the Chinese mainland studying in the U.S., making up a third of the total international students in the U.S., contributing tens of billions of dollars to the U.S. economy. From a long-term perspective, co-opetition, or the cooperation of those in competition with each other, should define China-U.S. relations. SOUNDBITE(English): MICHAEL SZONYI, Director of Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University "A healthy U.S.-China relationship will find the areas where cooperation makes the most sense and cooperate, will find the areas where competition makes the most sense and compete."